Best known as co-founder of BalletBoyz, William Trevitt was born in Cambridge in 1969. He joined the Royal Ballet aged 18 and was promoted to the role of principal in 1994. Along with fellow dancer Michael Nunn, he left six years later to found modern dance company BalletBoyz, where he now works as a choreographer. In 2012 they were both awarded OBEs. BalletBoyz makes its West End debut with Them/Us at Vaudeville theatre, London, 3-15 June.

1. Film

Yuli: The Carlos Acosta Story

Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Edlison Manuel Olbera Núñez Photograph: Denise Guerra

They’ve done something really interesting with the storytelling in this biopic, in which the real Carlos is staging a dance piece in which he plays his father and someone else plays the younger Carlos. They auditioned loads of young kids but couldn’t find the right one. Then this kid [Edilson Manuel Olbera Núñez] turned up without his parents, saying: “I heard there was an audition on and I thought I’d try out.” And he’s incredible. There’s this beautiful duet which says way more than you could say in a traditional film scene about the relationship between father and son.

2. Theatre

Lipstick: A Fairy Tale of Iran, Clapham Omnibus theatre

Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Siobhan O’Kelly in Lipstick: A Fairy Tale of Iran. Photograph: Flavia Fraser-Cannon

This billed itself as part spy story, part drag show, which sounds like a strange combination – and it was. It tells the story of a couple of friends: the young woman is an opera director who goes to Iran for work while her friend stays behind, and they’re trying to set up a drag club together. It took me a while to get into it, but gradually the drama unfolds and the characters become more and more three-dimensional and you really root for them. It’s so sensitively and subtly told and the overall power of it was amazing.

3. Album

Drift Code by Rustin Man

Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Rustin Man. Photograph: Lawrence Watson

I listen to Radio 6 a lot and often find myself Shazam-ing what I hear. One was a song by Rustin Man and it sounded like a fascinating combination of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young and Iain Matthews, with these beautiful harmonies; his voice has echoes of the last David Bowie album, Blackstar. But it’s not derivative – it’s like you’ve stumbled across a lost weekend of recordings where they bumped into each other and made a record. The whole thing is layered and beautifully produced and I just fell for it.

4. Photography

Don McCullin, Tate Britain

Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Northern Ireland, The Bogside, Londonderry 1971. Photograph: Don McCullin/The Tate

The breadth of his work, from horrifying war photographs to poverty in Britain to beautiful landscapes, is phenomenal. There was even a camera on display with a bullet hole in it which saved his life. I don’t think that you can take those kinds of photographs without having an incredible skill of connecting with people. I’ve read that there are lots of photographs he hasn’t taken, because he thinks they shouldn’t be, but others he knows that he has to take because the world has to see what he is seeing. I think that he has trodden that line with incredible precision.

5. Gig

Beirut, Hammersmith Apollo

Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Zach Condon of Beirut on stage. Photograph: C Brandon/Redferns

This was a perfectly judged birthday present from my wife: she was supposed to come with me but generously sacrificed her ticket to one of my sons. There was a time when he and his brother went into school and played Beirut’s song Elephant Gun on the ukulele, so it has a sentimental value as well. It was a great concert: you could feel that everyone there was buoyed up by it and that it was somehow reciprocal. The best kind of live performances have that feeling, where the performers get as much from it as the audience.

6. Art

Anna Liber Lewis x Four Tet: Muscle Memory

Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Photograph: Oliver Holms

This was at Elephant West, a protected petrol station in west London that’s been converted into an art gallery – the pumps are still there, inside boxes you can peer into. Anna Liber Lewis was childhood friends with Kieran Hebden: she grew up to be a visual artist, he is the musician Four Tet. So they did a collaborative event with her paintings and a big DJ set by him. Her work is really colourful, abstract, evocative. It was all so thrilling and unafraid – she’s a playful person making spontaneous decisions and the artwork reveals that.

Sourse: theguardian.com

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

two × one =